6 responses

  1. Spiro Spiliadis
    June 5, 2011

    One of the things I’ve realized and learned is that technology is nothing without function, and humans are nothing without function.

    What makes us smarter is function.
    Our brains have to function in order to work.

    What’s important here is to understand that learning and adaptability go hand and hand. In other words…

    For the pat three years, I’ve been following the thought processes of many people on twitter, the more intrigued I was with the consistency in topic, the better I was to position myself to learn and grow.

    Technology in itself did not do it, it was/is function of that technology.
    For example, twitter lists were meant for me to be able to keep up with the thought processes of a few people.

    Let’s take Graham Hill, Wim Rampen, yourself, all of which I have strategically placed in lists (value networks) that I can refer to on a continual basis.

    What I have realized is the information capturing, gathering, and referencing are all secondary to the primary understanding of real time information reciprocating…

    In other words, as technology brought us the ability to be active in real time, I am able to adapt to the information in real time, in a transitional day in and day out basis..

    So as I learn new information, i find ways to think, plan, do and act inside my spectrum of needs to do it….

    By being able to “function” by having ways to keep up to date with the “thought tails” of others I can learn and grow with them sharing…

    The word “smart” for me means dimensional timing. In other words, if i am asked a question, I can answer it right away, or I know exactly where to go and get the answer.

    It’s amazing to observe that when I have a certain thought or topic in mind about fitting a piece to the puzzle, it seems through my twitter stream the answer appears, perhaps indirectly through another post, but the idea is to be able to function, then learning and adapting the information in real time.

    Just saying….

    Reply

    • Greg
      June 5, 2011

      It’s true. Our skills adapt. Before we had to seek out information, now we have to filter it..

      – Greg

      Reply

  2. Venky
    June 6, 2011

    Interesting post Greg! Have you heard of the Whorfian Hypothesis? I have been reading about it for a while. According to Benjamin Whorf, linguistic patterns themselves determine what the individual perceives in this world and how he thinks about it. This means that the hyper-linked language of the Web is easily suited for pattern-recognition as it helps us to connect the dots. Of course, there have been many arguments against this hypothesis. But I believe, this might warrant us to look at “Is Web making us dumb/smart? ” in new light.

    Thanks for sharing those interesting links as well. Your blog never ceases to fascinate me..

    Reply

    • Greg
      June 6, 2011

      Venky,

      Never heard of the “Whorfian Hypothesis,” but it seems to make a lot of sense. I’ll check it out.

      Thanks for that!

      – Greg

      Reply

  3. Montel Yeary
    April 12, 2012

    Hi im a 14 year old and i read this article and just out of curiosity wouldnt technology make you dumber if you use it wrongly and use it for pleasure as like games, gossipping,or drama. instead of using it for school work or your job and thats probably why people are faling in life and not becoming successful is because technology is becoming a distraction. butgood job on the article and keep up the good work.

    Reply

    • Greg
      April 13, 2012

      Thank you Montel.

      – Greg

      Reply

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